Thursday, 15 July 2010

More Cameron Spin?

Reports on a meeting between David Cameron and about 150 failed Conservative candidates at the last general election are posted by Jonathan Isaby on Conservative Home. Stating that Cameron believed he did not get an outright majority because he didn't reassure enough swing voters (and not because the core vote was marginalised) Isaby writes:
"Whilst he said on the one hand that he didn't want to prejudge the findings of CCHQ's own inquiries into the election outcome, he was forthright in rejecting any suggestion that the party failed to win because it had failed to focus on core values or be Right-wing enough. The reason the party did not win a majority, he said, was because not enough people trusted the party with their vote and that more reassurance needed to be given to swing voters so that they could vote Conservative with confidence and without fear.
Observers of Mr Cameron yesterday came away with the impression that he views that coalition arrangement as a positive way of showing how much the Conservatives have embraced change in a way that should appear to those centre-ground voters.
It has also been reported to me that he seemed extremely bullish about the coalition providing the potential for a broader realignment of politics on the Centre Right........."
It is a fact that the last three Labour governments have left this country in a financial and social mess, each bigger than the last and culminating in that of Gordon Brown's. On each occasion it has taken a strong rightwing Conservative Party to rectify the situation, at great cost to the country. What the country was not offered at the last election was a Conservative Party of conviction and one prepared to discuss matters which the electorate wanted discussed. The electorate was faced with a Conservative Party that did not wish to upset any section of the electorate - failing dismally. In fact what cost David Cameron and the Conservative Party an outright majority was the lack of core conservative principles, coupled with the 'faux Eurosceptism' and Cameron's 'volte-face' on the question of a Lisbon Treaty referendum - another example of a clear promise broken. Arguing that "not enough people trusted the party with their vote and that more reassurance needed to be given to swing voters so that they could vote Conservative with confidence and without fear" is disingenuous on Cameron's part and it would be interesting to see the proof of his assertion.

David Cameron is no more centre-right than Gordon Brown is a disciple of the Pope and it can be argued that as the former is more centre-left in his political beliefs he has in fact set himself on a course of creating a new political party* (Liberal Conservatives) and hopes, in so doing, to create two 'fringe' parties of disaffected left-wing LibDems and 'right-wing' Conservatives. It is this blog's view that Cameron is intent on 'embedding' this country into the European Union and it is this question that will eventually split not only the Coalition, but also his party.

Both Cameron and Clegg have shown themselves to be opportunists and not men of principle, illustrated by their ready acquiescence to ditch policies purely in order to gain power. This blog would also argue that it is perfectly in order to question a politician's personal principles especially when that politician has presented himself as the guardian of the principles for which his country has a proud history.

And Cameron, Clegg and other MPs wonder why they are so reviled by the electorate?

 Afterthought: Do Cameron and Clegg have their own version of a 'Granita Pact'?

2 comments:

Woodsy42 said...

and that more reassurance needed to be given to swing voters so <\unquote>

Will the cloud of deluded thinking around Westminister ever clear away? All we heard from the previous lot was we are right but haven't explained it well enough.
Now this lot too - didn't reassure enough swing voters. They can't admit a fault - that their core voters simply didn't want Call me Dave's wierd left wing pseudo conservatism.
It's like Myra Hindley saying we would all love her if only she had smiled more. Arghh!

Witterings From Witney said...

W42, cud not agree more!